Mars: Students Role Play A Voyage to another Planet

This article discusses how having student role-playing at a younger age can help students become interested in science. More importantly, the students not only become interested in science but they are practicing science. As understood by educators, and mentioned in this article, role-playing is great for younger students because during the role playing they get to see ideas from a different perspective. This new perspective is a connection made to their schema, which is helping the students learn. I really liked this idea of using an unknown planet, that has never been explored by these younger students, in a way to have them practice being scientists. I think this strategy could work for students in kindergarten and first grade. Having the students prepare for a space launch, it puts them in the astronauts shoes. I also really like the idea of them building the space craft, and hovercrafts because it also helps the students practice the engineering practices. Let’s also not forget that this lesson is making science memorable for the students, so this will be a great connection to later ideas of science in the upper grades. Most likely I would never have thought of this idea, but after seeing this strategy used, I want to try it myself. I would most likely want to incorporate this idea into another science topic, because I think upper elementary students and even middle school students could get something out of role-playing a science topic. I would especially do this for the engineering practices, because students would learn a lot more about engineering if they are building hovercrafts or bridges, instead of measuring a cube’s volume. The students would have to apply their prior knowledge in this activity, but it would be fun for the students, so they all participate more most likely.  I’m glad I found this article, because this gave me a whole new idea on science lessons.

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